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Position

Position Positions consist of the major jobs and offices involved in the command and administration of a country and its military. They are filled by the characters of a realm and are one of the main mechanics by which the country and its characters interact, as not only the means by which characters can contribute their skills and attributes towards the betterment of the realm but also the most important source and easily controlled source of Power base power base and Loyalty.png loyalty. Proper character and position management requires a fine balance between choosing office holders who are the best and most competent at their jobs and what the needs of family loyalty and realm stability require.

Contents

MechanicsEdit

 
Appointing a new general

Most positions are filled by appointment and can generally be filled and dismissed freely by the player. Appointing a character to a position gives the loyalty modifier Granted Office, increasing   loyalty by +15 for 5 months, while revoking an office gives the modifier Revoked Offices decreasing   loyalty by -5 for 5 months. In general, a character can only hold one position at any given time, with the exception of ruler positions, and cannot be dismissed or replaced from their position if they become unloyal. Only adult citizens can be appointed to a position, with gender restrictions also applied unless they have been disabled.

Characters in positions are usually paid a certain percentage of the country's   income as their   wage, which is by modified country-wide with the   Monthly Wages for Characters modifier and per character by the   Monthly Wage modifier. Notably, each point of a character's   corruption increases the wage paid by 1%, which can eat up a significant portion of a nation's income of not kept under control (particularly with governors of rich provinces). Depending on the exact position they also may get a certain amount of   popularity,   prominence,   family prestige, and/or   statesmanship each month. All positions also give their holder   +2 power base, which depending on the position can then be increased based on the armies and ships commanded or regions governed.

Each major family will expect that their members hold a certain proportion of all currently held assignable positions, calculated as:

 

This includes positions such as government offices, governors, generals, and researchers, but not those that are chosen or elected outside of direct player control such as rulers or party leaders.

Any family that does not hold its expected number of positions is considered   scorned, which gives a   -20 loyalty malus to all family members.

A family that instead holds at least double the number of expected positions is  grateful and receives the following modifiers to all its members:

  •   +15 Loyalty
  •   -20% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.10% Monthly Statesmanship

It is usually important to balance positions between families, even if this results in suboptimal office holders, in order to ensure that families are not scorned. Alternatively, it may also be feasible to completely sideline a family and ensuring that it has no positions and little power base in order to appease the other families and more easily give them enough positions to get the grateful family bonuses.

RulerEdit

 
The standard interface for the ruler

  Each state is headed by a ruler, prominently visible on the Show Government tab of the   government panel, and their traits, attributes, and relationships have a significant effect on state modifiers, character loyalty, and Senate support. Rulers with high attributes can be a considerable boon to their country, significantly strengthening the state and allowing the nation to punch well above its weight, while corrupt, low attribute rulers can inflict major penalties that a state must struggle through. However, depending on the government form it may be possible to cover weak areas with a co-ruler or consort that has appropriately complementary attributes.

Unlike most positions, rulers are not appointed and dismissed at the whim of the player. The succession of power is instead determined by the type of government- dynastic inheritance in a monarchy, Senatorial election in republics, and rotation between Clan Chiefs in tribal nations, with rulers either reigning until death (as in monarchies and tribes) or for a certain fixed term (as in republics). Monarchies and Tribes tend to stay with the same ruler for much longer and so while the nation will enjoy prosperity under great rulers for a much longer period of time they will also have to suffer for extended periods of misrule by poor rulers, while the relatively rapid elections of Republics mean that their ruler attributes are on the whole more even. The lessened level of control over the choice of ruler, particularly in monarchies, means that countries must be prepared to deal with incompetent or problematic rulers more often than with other positions.

The ruler is always considered the governor of the capital province and additionally may be appointed as either the general or admiral of an army or navy if the gender rules allow for it; unlike most positions, however, they do not count towards the number of positions that a family holds unless they have also been appointed to a generalship or admiralship. Many events also take the point of view of the ruler, and different options may become available or unavailable based on the ruler's traits and attributes. Rulers of other states are prominently displayed in the Diplomacy screen, and building friends with foreign rulers can be a useful way to improve relations with another country.

Ruler / Co-Ruler Modifiers
Stat/Attribute Bonuses
  Martial
  •   +1.00% Manpower Recovery Speed
  •   +1.00% Army Morale Recovery
  Finesse
  •   -2.00% Build Cost
  •   -0.01 National Commerce Income
  Charisma
  •   +0.20 Claim Fabrication Speed
  •   -0.01 Monthly Tyranny
  Zeal
  •   -0.01 Monthly War Exhaustion
  •   +0.01 Monthly Stability Change
  Popularity For every point of popularity above 50:
  •   +0.0025 Monthly Legitimacy
  •   +0.002 Senate Influence
  •   -0.001 Monthly Tyranny

For every point of popularity below 50:

  •   -0.10% Primary Culture Happiness
  •   -0.005 Monthly Legitimacy
  •   -0.05 Senate Influence
  Corruption
  •   -0.50% Monthly Political Influence
  •   -0.001 Monthly Legitimacy
  •   +0.05% Pop Migration Speed
  •   +0.003 Populist Faction influence

In addition, the ruler gets the following character modifiers:

  •   +5% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.20 Monthly Popularity
  •   +2.00 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.40 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +2 Max Rivals
  •   +2 Max Friends
  •   +90 Prominence
  •   +0.80% Monthly Statesmanship
  •   +100 Loyalty

Co-RulerEdit

 
The aristocratic republic interface for the ruler, including the co-ruler

Aristocratic Republics are distinguished by power-sharing between two rulers who collectively co-head the government, the second of which is represented ingame by the co-ruler. Co-rulers are considered equivalent to the ruler for most ingame mechanics, contributing any of their four main attributes that they are more skilled in than the ruler (effectively providing a bonus to ruler attributes), averaging ruler   popularity between the ruler and co-ruler, and adding their   corruption to that of the ruler for the purposes of country modifiers. Unlike rulers, the co-ruler does not always have   100 loyalty, but instead gives a   1% political influence gain malus for every point of   below 50. The co-ruler is elected alongside the ruler in each election at the end of the term, with the second place candidate being elected with the same term and requirements as the main ruler.

Like rulers, co-rulers do not count towards the number of positions that a family holds unless they also hold another position, of which they can only be appointed as generals and admirals.

Co-rulers get the following character modifiers:

  •   +4% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.20 Monthly Popularity
  •   +2.00 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.40 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +2 Max Rivals
  •   +2 Max Friends
  •   +85 Prominence
  •   +0.50% Monthly Statesmanship

ConsortEdit

 
The monarchy interface for the ruler, including the consort and primary heir

In monarchies, the ruler can instead be supported by the consort, who is the spouse of the ruler. Like co-rulers, consorts will replace a ruler's attributes with their own for the purposes of running the country in any category where they are more skilled, and give a   1% political influence gain malus for every point of   below 50. It can therefore be very useful to marry rulers and potential heirs to spouses whose attributes can compensate for any weak points in their skills. Unlike in a co-rulership, a consort's   popularity and   corruption do not count towards ruler popularity and corruption for the purposes of calculating country modifiers.

Like rulers and co-rulers, consorts do not count towards the number of positions that a family holds unless they also hold another position. However, unlike them, consorts can be assigned to any other position as long as the gender rules allow for it.

Consorts get the following character modifiers:

  •   +2% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.05 Monthly Popularity
  •   +0.20 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.30 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +30 Prominence

Primary HeirEdit

A monarchy also has a special title for the primary heir who is first in line to inherit the throne. There are no mechanics or country modifiers associated with the primary heir, but the heir is still paid a monthly wage and gets bonuses to popularity, prominence, statesmanship, and loyalty. Primary heirs do not count towards the number of positions that a family holds unless they also hold another position, but they can be assigned to any other position as long as the gender rules allow for it.

Primary Heirs get the following character modifiers:

  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.20 Monthly Popularity
  •   +0.30 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +40 Prominence
  •   +0.10% Monthly Statesmanship
  •   +20 Loyalty

Government officesEdit

 
The government offices interface

Every country has a set of 8 major government offices that can be filled, representing important posts in the administration of the country. Every office is associated with a particular country modifier, the strength of which depends on the effective rating of the office holder. The effective rating is determined by multiplying the attribute of the office holder that is associated with the office by the holder's   statesmanship, which means that more experienced characters may be more effective at an office than a younger neophyte even if their innate skill is not as high. Furthermore, there are various events that can fire regularly affecting   ruler popularity and   stability depending on the   statesmanship of various office holders. This means that maintaining an officer for longer periods of time is more effective than constantly switching them out for newer characters with better attributes (but lower statesmanship), and as the main source of increasing statesmanship is itself being employed in an office this encourages appointing new up-and-coming characters to less important posts (including other offices but also research and governor posts, as their effectiveness does not depend on statesmanship) first in order to build up their experience and statesmanship before promoting them to higher and more crucial offices. Office holders also get bonuses to   prominence,   family prestige, and in republics   popularity, which makes them more favoured to be elected to ruling office.

Government offices are also the main source of   monthly political influence generation. Every office holder generates   +0.25 monthly political influence, scaled by their   loyalty as a fraction out of 100; this means that filling offices highly loyal officers will ensure a high level of political influence to use on all sorts of different projects, while a administration that is constantly working to block and undermine itself will find it difficult to gain the capital to do anything at all. Therefore, while officers do not have the increased power base of governors or generals that makes maintaining their loyalty important for avoiding civil wars, it is still important to keep an eye on the loyalty of office holders to ensure an adequate supply of political power for government actions.

With the exception of the consort and primary heir positions, government offices are mutually exclusive with all other positions. Office holders can generally be freely appointed and dismissed, but like all other appointed positions officers will refuse to leave their post if they are unloyal.

The offices available to a country depend on the government type. All governments have an office dedicated to   aggressive expansion change,   tax income,   omen power, and   health, while the other four vary, usually containing one or two military bonuses, happiness for a certain pop type, a stability-related modifier, and/or a modifier for a government-specific mechanic.

Republic officesEdit

In addition to the usual four offices, republics have offices for   Senate influence, a military bonus in   discipline,   sacrifice to the gods cost, and happiness for   freemen.

Office Attribute State Modifier (per effective attribute) Character Modifiers Description
Censor     Senate influence: +0.1
  • Note: the Senate influence is applied to the faction that the Censor is part of
  •   +2% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.25 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +30 Prominence
  •   +0.80% Monthly Statesmanship
This office is the republic's chief magistrate with responsibility over the state census, public morality, and clearing blockages in the senate and courts.
Magistrate     Aggressive expansion change: −0.015
  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.01 Monthly Popularity
  •   +0.05 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +10 Prominence
  •   +0.70% Monthly Statesmanship
  •   +0.05 Mercantile Conviction
This office manages the republic's economy and the conduct of foreign and domestic trade, ensuring the smooth flow of currency and goods.
Tribune of the Soldiers     Discipline: +0.5%
  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.05 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +10 Prominence
  •   +0.80% Monthly Statesmanship
  •   +0.05 Military Conviction
This office oversees the quality of the republic's military by managing their training, logistics, and discipline.
Tribune of the Treasury     Tax Income: +1.5%
  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.01 Monthly Popularity
  •   +0.05 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +10 Prominence
  •   +0.80% Monthly Statesmanship
  •   +0.05 Military Conviction
This office is in charge of administering the republic's treasury by ensuring the collection of taxes and the payment of military pensions.
Augur     Omen power: +3%
  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.05 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +5 Prominence
  •   +0.60% Monthly Statesmanship
  •   +0.05 Religious Conviction
This office is a senior priest and the republic's chief interpreter of the will of the gods through haruspicy and augury.
High Priest     Sacrifice to the gods cost: −2%
  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.05 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +10 Prominence
  •   +0.80% Monthly Statesmanship
  •   +0.05 Religious Conviction
This office is the chief high priest of the republic, responsible for overseeing the priesthood, conducting state sacrifices, and religious festivals.
Tribune of the People     National freemen happiness: +0.5%
  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.01 Monthly Popularity
  •   +0.05 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +10 Prominence
  •   +0.80% Monthly Statesmanship
  •   +0.05 Civic Conviction
This office represents the republic's freemen with the authority to check the power of the senate and intervene on behalf of freemen in the courts.
Physician     Health: +0.005%
  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.05 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +5 Prominence
  •   +0.50% Monthly Statesmanship
  •   +0.05 Civic Conviction
This office is the most senior doctor of the republic and is responsible for the care of senior politicians and their families.

Monarchy officesEdit

The unique monarchy offices give modifiers for   legitimacy, two military bonuses in   morale of armies and   mercenary army maintenance, as well as to   sacrifice to the gods cost.

Office Attribute State Modifier (per effective attribute) Character Modifiers Description
Chancellor     Monthly aggressive expansion: −0.015
  •   +2% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.05 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +30 Prominence
  •   +0.80% Monthly Statesmanship
This office is the monarch's chief diplomat responsible for the reputation of the ruler and state in foreign courts.
Royal Tutor     Sacrifice to the gods cost: −2%
  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.08 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +15 Prominence
  •   +0.50% Monthly Statesmanship
This office is the monarch's royal tutor and oversees the education of the children of the ruler and important nobles at court.
Marshal     Mercenary army maintenance: −1%
  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.05 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +30 Prominence
  •   +0.80% Monthly Statesmanship
This office is the marshal in charge of the organization and performance of the monarch's armies including training, logistics and recruitment.
Master of the Guard     Morale of armies: +1%
  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.05 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +10 Prominence
  •   +0.60% Monthly Statesmanship
This office is in charge of the monarch's royal bodyguard and oversees their personal protection and maintains domestic order.
High Priest     Omen power: +3%
  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.05 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +30 Prominence
  •   +0.80% Monthly Statesmanship
This office is the monarch's high priest and directs religious sacrifices, festivals and the interpretation of the god's will.
Court Philosopher     Monthly legitimacy: +0.015
  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.05 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +10 Prominence
  •   +0.60% Monthly Statesmanship
This office is the monarch's court philosopher who supervises libraries and the gathering and protection of knowledge.
Steward     National tax: +1.5%
  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.05 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +40 Prominence
  •   +0.80% Monthly Statesmanship
This office is the royal steward responsible for administering the collection of taxes and government spending for the monarch.
Physician     Health: +0.005%
  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.05 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +5 Prominence
  •   +0.50% Monthly Statesmanship
This office is the court physician responsible for the medical treatment and health of the monarch and their subjects.

Tribal officesEdit

Tribes offices give two military bonuses in   cohort recruit speed and   manpower recovery speed and have happiness modifiers for   tribesmen and   citizens. Notably, their   aggressive expansion office is weaker than in republics or monarchies, which is compensated for by a stronger   national tax modifer.

Office Attribute State Modifier (per effective attribute) Character Modifiers Description
Arbitrator     Monthly aggressive expansion: −0.01
  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.20 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +10 Prominence
  •   +0.80% Monthly Statesmanship
This office is in charge of managing domestic tribal relations and settling disputes in the name of the chief.
Elder     National tribesmen happiness: +1.5%
  •   +2% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.10 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +10 Prominence
  •   +0.70% Monthly Statesmanship
This office is a senior member of the tribe selected for their experience, who advises the chief on tribal matters.
Warchief     Cohort recruit speed: +2%
  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.30 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +20 Prominence
  •   +0.80% Monthly Statesmanship
This office is the most senior military advisor to the chief responsible, for raising and managing their armies.
Bodyguard     Manpower recovery speed: +1.5%
  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.10 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +5 Prominence
  •   +0.70% Monthly Statesmanship
This office is in charge of managing the chief's personal bodyguards, retinues, and their morale.
High Priest     Omen power: +3%
  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.10 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +5 Prominence
  •   +0.80% Monthly Statesmanship
This office is the chief's most senior priest, and directs religious sacrifices, festivals, and divination.
Wise One     National citizen happiness: +1%
  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.05 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +5 Prominence
  •   +0.60% Monthly Statesmanship
This office is selected for their learning and advises the chief on a wide variety of matters, from astronomy to technology.
Magistrate     National tax: +2%
  •   +2% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.10 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +10 Prominence
  •   +0.80% Monthly Statesmanship
This office is in charge of the tribe's treasury and the collection of tribute in the name of the chief.
Apothecary     Health: +0.005%
  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.05 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.10 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +5 Prominence
  •   +0.50% Monthly Statesmanship
This office supervises the medical treatment and health of the chief and tribal nobility.

GovernorsEdit

 
The governor in the territory interface

Governors are appointed to lead the administration of provinces too far from the capital to be effectively controlled from the capital, effectively ruling a particular region on behalf of the central government. A governor can be appointed to any non-capital region that the country owns territories in, though they may only administer a single region at a time.   Finesse is the most important attribute for determining a governor's skill, giving a   +2.5% population output modifier for each point. Changing the governor policy of a province requires that its region has a governor; a policy will be automatically selected and set or reset each time a new governor is appointed, and the effects of a governor policy are also scaled to the governor's   finesse according to the following formula:

 

Governors also have a significant impact on provincial loyalty. Every province in a governorship will get   +0.005 local provincial loyalty for each point of governor   loyalty above 50 (to a maximum of +0.25), and similarly   -0.005 local provincial loyalty for each point of governor   loyalty below 50 (to a minimum of -0.25), so it can be useful to appoint more loyal governors to troublesome regions. There are also a number of traits governors can have that give various bonuses or maluses to territories in their governorship.

A region that does not have a governor appointed will have a severe malus for each of its territories:

  •   -50% Local Tax
  •   -25% Local Research Points
  •   -0.25 Local Provincial Loyalty

Unlike all other positions, governors are not paid a certain portion of the country's income from the treasury, but rather are expected to collect a portion of the region's income as their   wage. Their wage is therefore proportional to the overall wealth of their region, and every territory in a governorship region will get a base malus of   -25% local tax and   -25% local commerce modifier. The governor's   corruption increases this malus by -0.125% per point as well as increasing the wage that the governor is paid, sapping away at the income that the country receives from its provinces. Governor corruption also increases   unrest by +0.05 per point up to +5 unrest at   100 corruption, which means that highly corrupt governors can be very detrimental to the stability of the realm if not handled properly - either by imposing sanctions or removing them from their post altogether.

In addition to the   +2 power base from the governor office, all governors will also gain   +1 power base for every percentage of the country's   population in the governorship region. Governors will therefore take up a significant portion of the country's total power base, particularly if the country is relatively small, and those of large, populous regions especially must be kept (or appointed to be) content and loyal. The   loyalty of governors modifier applies loyalty modifiers specifically to governors, and is particularly important in monarchies where each of the more advanced laws give either a bonus or malus to governor loyalty (with a corresponding malus or bonus to general loyalty), forcing monarchies to balance between appeasing the two.

Like all other appointed positions, governors can be assigned and dismissed at will (unless they are disloyal, at which point they will refuse to leave their post). Governorships are mutually exclusive with most other positions, though there are some cases where there is overlap between the responsibilities of governors and other position holders. Rulers are considered the governor of the capital region for all intents and purposes, including pop output bonuses from   finesse and unrest from   corruption, except that they do not collect their wage from the capital region (as it is collected directly from the treasury) and so territories in the capital region do not receive a malus for the wage. Note that this automatic governorship is not considered an assignable office that counts towards a family's number of held positions. Additionally, armies that are   assigned to a region will use the region's governor as its commander, who will contribute his/her   to the army's modifiers and gain   power base based on the proportion of all cohorts in the army they have under their command.

Each governor gets the following character modifiers:

  •   +0.05 Monthly Popularity
  •   +0.10 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.25 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +10 Prominence
  •   +0.35% Monthly Statesmanship

Military positionsEdit

GeneralsEdit

 
A general in the army interface

Generals are the main commanders of a country's armies and are responsible for installing discipline in its men as well as leading them into battle. A general can be appointed to take command of any single army on the map, though they cannot be replaced or dismissed if their army is in combat or for the first 12 months after their appointment, and will furthermore be unable to be appointed to any new commands (army or navy) for 12 months after being replaced or dismissed, making it generally unviable to constantly swap generals around between armies. Unlike most other positions, rulers and co-rulers can be appointed as the general of an army; this counts as a held position for their family, if they are part of one.

For each point of its general's   martial skill, an army will gain   +5% assault ability and   +1% enslavement efficiency as well as a bonus to dice rolls in combat, allowing well-lead armies to punch significantly above their weight in combat. An army without a general will instead get a   -25% land morale and   +1% experience decay modifier, making them very vulnerable to a properly led army; even a weak, low martial general is much better than not having a general at all.

As commanders of the army, generals get a significant boost to their   power base proportional to the number of cohorts they command. Every cohort that a general commands also has a chance of becoming   loyal to the general each month, scaling based on the general's   charisma,   martial,   wealth,   popularity, number of already loyal cohorts, and traits, as well as various country-specific modifiers. Loyal cohorts provide power base to the character they are loyal to rather than their commander, even if that character is no longer a general, but the sponsor will pay 33% of the cohort's maintenance instead of the state. If a loyal cohort is disbanded, they will become loyal veterans attached to their sponsor and continue to provide   power base. Generals are also affected by the   loyalty of generals modifier, which is particularly important for monarchies who have to choose between laws that either increase or decrease the modifier by a significant amount.

As with all other positions, generals will refuse to leave their post if they become disloyal; as with governors, generals are more prone to this due to the large   power base they get from the cohorts they command. Disloyal generals also have the additional complication of refusing to follow commands from the government, ignoring all orders and preventing all interactions with the army. This can be problematic during a war, as automated armies will generally not coordinate much, if at all, with your other armies and will pursue their own objectives instead of the player's, generally reducing the effectiveness of the army.

Each general has the following modifiers:

  •   +2.5% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.20 Monthly Popularity
  •   +0.20 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +30 Prominence
  •   +0.01 Military Conviction

In particular, generals have one of the highest wages of all positions, surpassed only rulers, co-rulers, and clan chiefs (who themselves also serve as leaders of their retinues). As each general takes a portion of the entire country's income as their wage, even a large empire can only have so many governors before their wages become a serious issue, providing a soft cap on the number of armies that generals can lead. For that reason it is generally better to have a smaller number of larger, better equipped and well-led armies than to spend vast amounts of gold paying dozens of generals across the empire. This also means that while it is possible to create small one-cohort armies that can be assigned to characters as a powerless office in order to inflate the family's number of positions, this is not usually worth doing because of their substantial pay.

In addition to the base popularity gain, generals can also gain   wealth and   popularity from winning battles and sacking cities and capitals; the latter is particularly useful when the ruler is appointed to the general, as the loot is instead accrued directly to the treasury and popularity can easily be converted into   using the influence character interaction. Generals also gain   monthly family prestige and additional   military conviction based on the proportion of the country's army they currently command, which altogether means that particularly successful generals are often strong-performing candidates in republic elections.

AdmiralsEdit

 
A admiral in the navy interface

Admirals are the naval counterparts to generals, as the commanders of a nation's fleets, and most mechanics apply analogously. An admiral can be appointed to command a single fleet if they do not already hold another assignable position, except for rulers and co-rulers, and like generals have a 12 month cooldown before they can be replaced or dismissed as well as another 12 month cooldown before they can be assigned another command. Like with armies, a fleet in the middle of battle also cannot have its admiral changed.

An admiral's   martial skill gives   +0.2% ship capture chance per point and gives a bonus to dice rolls in combat, potentially significantly increasing their fleet's effectiveness during engagements. An navy without a admiral will instead get a   -25% naval morale and   +1% experience decay modifier, which similarly makes an unled navy highly vulnerable.

As naval commanders admirals also gain   power base proportional to how much of the country's navy they have under their command, though the power base of commanded fleets is much less than that of armies. There is no loyalty mechanic for ships or fleets analogous to the cohort loyalty mechanic. Like with generals, there is a   loyalty of admirals modifier that gives loyalty modifiers specifically to admirals.

Each admiral has the following modifiers:

  •   +2% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.10 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +20 Prominence
  •   +0.01 Military Conviction

Like with generals, admirals are also paid a significant amount of the nation's income that can be problematic if too many are hired, though this is usually somewhat less of a problem as a navy's high mobility means that it is rare that more than 2 or 3 are needed. Admirals will also gain   from winning battles, though as there are generally less naval battles in a war and no cities for admirals to sack they generally will not reach the level of popularity that successful generals do.

ResearchersEdit

 
Researchers in the technology interface

Researchers oversee the progress of technological discovery and advances inside the country. One researcher can be appointed for each field of advances, providing a         +10% tech investment bonus to that field for every point of the researcher's corresponding attribute. As the main source of tech investment modifiers, a good researcher can considerably speed up the rate of technological advances in the country (and vice versa), and lack of penalties from having an unloyal researcher means that it is generally optimal to appoint the characters with the highest attribute in each field as researcher. Note that each researcher can only be appointed to a single field at a time (and cannot currently hold any other assignable position), and that researchers do not have any effect on invention cost.

Each researcher gets the following modifiers:

  •   +1% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.05 Monthly Popularity
  •   +0.05 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.30 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +30 Prominence
  •   +0.25% Monthly Statesmanship
  •   +0.01 Civic Conviction

Notably, researchers gain statesmanship from their position but their bonuses are not affected by their statesmanship. This makes it possible to appoint high attribute but low statesmanship characters into the researcher office in order to accumulate statesmanship for another more important office later, though depending on how this is used this may come at the cost of optimizing technological progression.

Party LeadersEdit

 
Party leaders in the government interface

In republics, each of the 5 Senate factions has a party leader who heads the faction and wields a large amount of influence in determining how it votes. Each point of a party leader's   charisma generates           +0.10 monthly support for their faction (doubled for the   populist party leader), which is typically the main determinant of how much a faction's influence grows or shrinks over time - eliminating high charisma leaders and ensuring their successors are not nearly so skilled is generally the most effective way to decrease and suppress a faction's power. Faction voting in the Senate is also strongly influenced by their leader - befriending a faction leader is one of the easiest ways to increase support in the Senate for various actions, while members of a faction will almost never support any aggressive interactions against their leaders.

Party leaders also get a   +100% succession support bonus from their faction, ensuring that they always their faction's full support when calculating succession support. This means that party leaders of larger factions are usually prime candidates to be elected as ruler or co-ruler, as long as they are eligible. Family members of the party leader also get a small   +10% succession support bonus, even if they are not part of the actual faction themselves.

When a party leader dies or leaves the country, he or she will be immediately replaced, typically with the most next most   prominent member of the faction. Members of other parties may also join the faction and become the leader if a party has too few remaining candidates for party leader. The faction conviction of a party leader does not change and a party leader will never switch factions, even if they do somehow get higher conviction in a faction other than the one they lead.

Each party leader has the following modifiers:

  •   +0.15 Monthly Popularity
  •   +0.35 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.05 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +5 Prominence
  •   +0.05% Monthly Statesmanship

As it is not an assignable position, a party leader title by itself does not count towards the number of held positions that a major family expects to have, but party leaders may be elected or appointed to any other position as long as they meet the requirements. As high   prominence characters are more likely to be chosen as party leaders, they will tend to already hold some sort of position in the government.

Clan ChiefsEdit

 
Clan chiefs in the government interface

  Tribal nations have a number of clan chiefs that lead their clan/family and represent its interests in the country, taking the place of family heads in other countries. The ruler of a tribal nation is always one of the clan chiefs; when the ruler dies, the next ruler will be elected from the clan chief with the next highest   succession support, as determined by their attributes. When a clan chief dies, the title will be assigned to the next head of the family on the next monthly tick, typically the next oldest member of the family.

Clan chiefs cannot be appointed to other positions, but they will always lead their   clan retinues as a general and cannot be displaced from that position. These retinues are always personally loyal to the chief and make up the bulk of their   power base, as clan chiefs do not get power base from their clan's share of the total country   family prestige - they instead get   +1 prominence for each percentage of the country's total   family prestige that belongs to their clan. This means that like normal heads of families, clan chiefs are typically among the most powerful characters in a tribal nation, and their loyalty is particularly important as since they are the representatives of the main clans of the tribe, clan chiefs have a significant say in the internal affairs of the country and all clan chiefs must be loyal in order to change   laws and enacting certain decisions, particularly those relating to government form. In addition to the usual loyalty modifiers, the   loyalty of clan chiefs modifier will apply loyalty modifiers specifically to clan chiefs only, which is affected by some laws, event modifiers, and   ruler popularity.

Like all other non-appointed positions, the clan chief position itself does not count towards the number of positions a family holds; however, as clan chiefs are almost always leading their retinues, they will be considered to hold a position by virtue of being a general.

All clan chiefs have the following modifiers:

  •   +3% Monthly Wage
  •   +0.15 Monthly Popularity
  •   +0.10 Monthly Character Prominence
  •   +0.35 Monthly Family Prestige
  •   +40 Prominence


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